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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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CONCERT SERIES: Bob Dylan

STATESMAN ARCHIVES

On May 13, 1991, Bob Dylan gave the first show to ever be held in the west wing of the Indoor Sports Complex. According to the Statesman‘s review of the performance, sound quality was affected by acoustics problems and Dylan’s singing was akin to mumbling. Regardless, the crowd was pleased with the selection of songs, which included “Lay Lady Lady,” “Blowing in the Wind” and “Like a Rolling Stone.” Dylan was touring for his 27th album, “Under the Red Sky,” which was released in September of 1990. The album received poor reviews and sold poorly, peaking at number 38 on US charts.

That same year, Dylan was presented with the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award by Jack Nicholson. In 1994, he recorded two live shows for MTV Unplugged which were released as greatest hits compilations. Three years later, “Time Out of Mind” won Dylan his first Solo Album of the Year Grammy Award. The album was his first collection of original songs in seven years that received praise.
President Clinton gave Dylan was Kennedy Center Honor in December of 1997 in the East Room of the White House.
Then, in March 2001, Dylan won an Oscar Award for the song “Things Have Changed,” which he penned for the film “Wonder Boys.” Two years later, Dylan (under the alias Sergei Petrov) and director Larry Charles wrote the filmed “Marked & Anonymous.” Dylan played the central character alongside actors Jeff Bridges, Penelope Cruz and John Goodman.
In 2004 the first part of his autobiography, “Chronicles: Volume One,” was released and piqued at number two on the New York Times non-fiction best seller list. Dylan went on to score Martin Scorcese’s “No Direction Home,” which premiered on PBS in September 2005. His album “Modern Times” was released in 2006 and entered the US charts at number one. The album was his first to reach that status since “Desire” in 1976 and earned him three Grammy Award nominations, of which he won Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album.
When his album “Together Through Life” debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart in April of 2009, Dylan, at age 67, became the oldest artist to ever debut at number one.
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