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The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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Pumpkin spice madness needs to end

(Art by JeriAnne Vestuto)
(Art by JeriAnne Vestuto)

Starbucks’ top-selling beverage has made an early return this year. Yes, indeed, the Pumpkin Spice Latte has come yet again, ushering in a wave of pumpkin-flavored products that have taken American consumers by storm. Ever since the Pumpkin Spice Latte debuted in 2003, coffee lovers have fallen in love with the beverage, drinking it by the liter for years to come. Needless to say, the success Starbucks has experienced selling pumpkin spice lattes has earned the attention of other companies and food manufacturers.

Many food giants, including Nabisco, Pringles and Kraft, are guilty of jumping on the bandwagon of Starbucks’ pumpkin spice-laced prosperity. A recent grocery-shopping trip has exposed me to this nationwide pumpkin pandemonium that has ravaged the shelves of every store. Countless orange-colored packages labeled with the words “Pumpkin” and “limited time only” lined the aisles. During that one trip, I felt as if I had seen it all; everything from pumpkin spice flavored Oreos to Trader Joe’s pumpkin-flavored dog treats.

Even retail stores have shamelessly joined in on the fun. The reason as to why people wish to smell like food has always remained a mystery to me. But, if you ever feel like smelling like a Thanksgiving dinner, you should definitely stop by Bath & Body Works and give the Cinnamon Pumpkin fragrance line a try.

It is obvious that companies need a gimmick to promote their businesses if they ever hope to be considered fierce competitors to Starbucks during the fall. Or maybe they just want to incorporate Starbucks’ success into their own products.

Unfortunately, it does not seem like any imitators, rivals and charlatans will have the upper hand when going toe to toe with Starbucks’ pumpkin spice lattes. Despite being a seasonal beverage, the Pumpkin Spice Latte has acquired the status of a celebrity icon. It has its own hashtag (#PSL), Twitter account and Facebook page. There was even  clamor about Durex, a condom manufacturing company, unveiling its new pumpkin spice condom. Yet, this was dispelled as a false rumor in due time.

The pendulum has swung too far this time. Pumpkin spice has infiltrated everything. Our taste buds and nostrils are not safe from tinges of cinnamon, nutmeg and all-spice wafting through the crisp, autumn breeze. This obsession with pumpkin flavorings and aromas has come too early. And tragically, there is no glimmer of hope that this trend will die soon.

American businesses have always had a penchant for excessively advertising their latest and greatest products. However, since the fall season lacks an abundance of holidays and seasonal events, the promotion of pumpkin spice goods is saturated throughout the months of September, October and November.

If companies really wanted to see profits, they should rely on innovation rather than imitation. Instead of directing all the focus on pumpkins and spices, perhaps companies can diversify their outlook and introduce new scents and flavors to please our palettes. After all, no one can handle too much of a good thing. American consumers are no exception. Unless manufacturers realize this truth, people will eventually be tired with this pumpkin spice madness and move onto something else.

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