The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

72° Stony Brook, NY
The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

Newsletter

    Honda Crushes Competitors in Engine Design

    I frequent a group of websites and magazines that are auto-related, and continually read a lot of hype regarding American cars.’ When Ford redesigned their 3.5-liter V6, it was as if an infant was taking its first steps.’ Finally, many wrote, Ford is taking a baby step in the right direction.’ When I caught wind of Honda’s completed engine redesign efforts recently, it shows that American companies pale in comparison.’ Honda completed a redesign of their 2.4-liter I4 engine, overhauled their FlexFuel offerings, and built a new diesel engine from the ground up.’ I would wager any amount that these engines are going to be class-leading when they make their way into next year’s models, leaving companies like Ford and GM in the dust.

    Kenichi Nagahiro, Honda’s head engine designer who developed the iconic VTEC engine, set out to build a diesel from scratch.’ Its latest incarnation, ready for production this month, is a diesel that is cleaner than, more powerful than, and more efficient than the rest of the competition.’ While VW and Mercedes though they had a lock on the market, Honda was quietly outperforming them in the laboratory.’ Now that we enjoy ultra low sulfur diesel in the US as of this summer, by 2008 it is conceivable that you could be driving an Accord with the most sophisticated diesel engine in the world.

    Whenever a consumer puts FlexFuel (ethanol-based fuel) into a typical FlexFuel engine, the result is less power and less efficiency.’ Honda engineers set to combat this problem as well, as they revamped their FlexFuel system.’ They now have the first FlexFuel engine that can run on anything from E10 to E100 while delivering the performance and fuel economy of a gasoline engine.’ Just in time for this global energy crisis, no?

    Going back to the basics, Honda redesigned the VTEC engine, giving it more torque across the rev board while increasing fuel efficiency by 13%.’ That Accord 4-cylinder starts to look a lot more appealing, delivering well over 30 mpg.’ Aside from great specifications, given Honda’s track record, I’m confident that their new 2.4-liter is going to be far more reliable than what powers the Chevy Cobalt.

    Does this mean that Honda is the best automaker out there?’ I don’t think so.’ They can’t compete in the styling department, in my humble opinion.’ Given the choice between a Chrysler 300 and a Honda Accord for the same price, even though the Accord has superior engineering, my heart will take me to the Chrysler dealership.’ Maybe it’s time to start really expanding on this whole globalist paradigm- imagine if Honda sold engines to Chrysler, or Ford or GM.’ Wouldn’t you love to buy a Dodge Caliber with a VTEC engine?’ I would.’ They are so far ahead of the curve in this one area that it seems ridiculous not to have Honda engines available in every manufacturer’s car.’ When Honda powered the Saturn Vue with a great 3.5-liter V6, I’m sure that was the best built Saturn you could buy at the time.

    I look forward to the day when either the Accord and Civic are appealing to the eye, or when I can get a Honda engine in another company’s car.’ Until then, we are forced to sacrifice taste for engineering- a choice we have had to deal with in the auto industry for decades.

    Leave a Comment
    Donate to The Statesman

    Your donation will support the student journalists of Stony Brook University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

    More to Discover
    Donate to The Statesman

    Comments (0)

    All The Statesman Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *