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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    Book Review: “The Spoken Word of Spirit” by Jim Fargiano

    “Freedom and peace can be achieved only when oppressors turn blind towards the ignorance of their own philosophies and open their hearts to sensible freedom and peace for all. Sometimes, they need help seeing this. Are you prepared to teach them?” This quote, from “The Spoken Words of Spirit” by Jim Fargiano, essentially sums up the underlining message of his book: How can you make this world a better place for you and your children?

    Fargiano is more than just a spiritual author. He is a psychic medium. His first book, published last year, offers a thoughtful look into the world of the metaphysical being. He offers explanations on an assortment of messages that he has collected over the years from the spiritual side. His text does not try to convert readers, but seeks to affirm the hints and whispers that we all experience in our daily lives. It is a book about believing in what we already know.

    There is quite a shocking cast in “The Spoken Words of Spirit,” including everyone from Saint Paul to Leonardo Da Vinci, to One Feather. Each spirit comes across with an identifiably distinct voice. The last member on Fargiano’s list has a particularly philosophical impact on the book’s theme, relating past life experiences to relevant teachings. To many, this might sound strange, ridiculous, or even intriguing. If you approach this read with an open mind, you might find that the lessons conveyed in these messages are more important than the spirits who are orating them.

    Fargiano’s style and tone is somewhat literary, but it does not conform to a standard format. There is an interweaving story which does more teaching than developing an actual plot. His writing evokes a sense that the great biblical authors of the past have been resurrected. If they were around today, this is the kind of book they might write.

    At some points, his story almost reads like a self-help book. This is not necessarily a bad thing for his genuine concern about taking control of one’s destiny is a respectable goal. He consistently reminds us that our abilities are only limited by our own self-construed confines over the years. We must learn to break free of these binds and embrace a higher existence.

    There are many themes layered in each message, but at its roots, the book is about taking action, accepting responsibility for what you do, and embracing positive change with an open mind. It is your mind, after all, that often bars us from truly and honestly connecting to our spiritual existence. More than anything, life, according to Fargiano, is about having the right mindset in all endeavors in your life.

    If you want to believe in messages from the higher power, then this is the book for you. If you are a skeptic, then you can still find value in the lessons of positive thinking and general goodwill. Fargiano believes that we are the masters of our lives. We often attribute our ills and successes to fate or fortune, but these outcomes are ultimately connected to our wills and what we make out of what we have been given.

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