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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    The G.O.P Needs a Facelift

    I thought it was a bit premature to already be formulating who the new face of the GOP was and who would be the front runner for the Republicans in 2012, but I guess after the stunning electoral defeat we saw just a few weeks ago, it is never too early to start rebuilding your party’s image.

    After all, the Republicans were not just beaten on Nov. 4. They suffered a crushing loss, a complete repudiation of the George Bush administration and the warped world of modern Republican thought. Surely, it is never too early to start thinking about the future.

    So what will the new image be? How will the GOP restructure themselves so that they have a chance to seriously compete in the next election? I have been reading about possible candidates and all seem as desperate as the next. Sarah Palin, for example, is the definition of the phrase “delusions of grandeur” if you ask me. There are some polls that show how she is still viewed favorably by the overwhelming majority of Republicans, however, the problem is that this kind of viewpoint is exactly what led to the McCain/Palin ticket failing. You can shine to the base all you want, but it is the moderates and non-affiliated voters that you need to convince in order to win any election.

    Perhaps more than worrying about who their next front runner should be, the Republicans should focus more on restructuring what the their party’s platform is. I think one of the strongest voices for this kind of revival of traditional Republican ideals is that of Ron Paul. I still shake my head remembering back to how little consideration he was really given during the primary season, especially during the debates.

    He seems to me to be the only Republican who truly realizes how far his party has strayed from its origins. Hopefully after the GOP’s massive loss, there will be a movement to shift back to Republican roots. Small government, individual rights, and economic freedoms are ideas that I think will appeal much more to the modern middle class American than surrounding your party around divisive issues like abortions, gay marriage, and Darwinism.

    Maybe I am wrong though. Perhaps the Republicans will continue to march on, simply tweaking the ideology that represented them during the George Bush era. For their sake I hope not though. If this election taught us anything, it is that the average American is tired of watching politicians fight over philosophical differences. To me, that was what truly won the election for Barack Obama. His ability to say, “Hey you’re being screwed over. Here’s a plan and this is what I’ll change,” was key over John McCain’s warning words of, “Who is the real Barack Obama?”

    If the Republicans are going to win in 2012, then they have a great deal of work to get done. Much of their chances, however, probably lay in Barack Obama’s ability to cope with the country’s current crises. If he is able to “fix” the nation’s economy, then any candidate is going to be at odds to beat an already favorable figure. If he fails however, then it will be a whole new ball game to play. The next election might still four years away, but hey, the primary season is just around the corner.

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