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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    Why Teens Should Vote

    If you are currently 18 years of age, you are probably wondering, as well as questioning, why it’s important to vote. While the answers are many, the most common argument pertains to the fact that by voting you make sure your voice is being heard, enabling yourself to get involved in what’s happening around you.

    First and foremost I must speak of the many courageous people who died to give us right to vote. Amongst these people stand very famous reform leaders that we all know — Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Booker T. Washington and John F. Kennedy are just some of the people who went through hell to see minorities speak their minds and in all, just to have a voice. They fought for various years so that one day, we could have a say in what happens in our society. These rights should not be taken for granted.

    This generation needs to vote now in order to make the world a better place for the next. If you are thinking “the next generation has nothing to do with me,” then you have no idea how wrong you are. The next generation has everything to do with you. There are many issues going on right now that will affect our futures. Theses include social security, health care, immigration and federal funding for social programs. Our country will not survive if we don’t pick a leader with a plan to deal with these things.

    It is critical for young girls to get out and vote, to protect abortion rights, because we’re voting for the person that is going to share our beliefs. Don’t vote for someone who is pro-life when you aren’t for it. You will have to live with the consequences of having to comply with rules you don’t agree with. Get up and choose your president, make your representative a person who share similar beliefs as you. And in the end, you will be killing two birds with the same stone — making your voice be heard, and eliminating the stereotypes that certain people have of young adults being lazy.

    For some reason, elderly people seem to be have a misconception that young people don’t vote because they are lazy. You can prove them right by not voting, but you are only hurting the image of our generation. On the contrary, if you don’t want anybody categorizing your group, why not prove them wrong? Do some research and see which candidate best reaches your “presidential standards.” You’re the boss, and what you say goes.

    Last but not least, I know that people my age love complaining. Well, voting certifies and gives you the right to brag and complain about anything you want. You gain that right once you check off the person you want to represent your generation, your neighborhood, and your lifestyle in general. If you don’t vote, you’ve thrown away your method to complain about the government in a constructive way, that will make positive changes. On the other hand, if you do vote, you can become involved and have opinions on whatever you like.

    Voting is a right, but it’s also a privilege. Many people, old and young alike, would and have died for such privileges. As a young adult you should know what to expect from the person who is going to make decisions for you, for the next four — or even eight — years of your life. This government is meant”for the people, by the people,” go ahead and begin to start participating in shaping your government.

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