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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    Memorable Eurydice

    When you first walk into a theater, one of the first things you notice is the stage set. In “Eurydice,” the stage is especially striking, as an illusion of a hill emerges over the audience. This creative and innovative set adds to the entire dramatic setting of the play that is currently running in Theater Two of the Staller Center until this Sunday. The stage also captured the essence of the story written by playwright Sarah Ruhl, based on the Greek myth about Eurydice and Orpheus.

    The Stones — Katelyn Gleason (Small Stone), George Edwin Hutchinson (Tall Stone), Rob Shilling (Loud Stone) — are the funniest and most dramatic characters in the cast. Their unemotional and grumpy personas are reminiscent of Ricky Gervais, who played the grumpy dentist, Bertram Pincus D.D.S., in “Ghost Town.” The Stones lighten up the mood whenever Orpheus (Matthew Willings) is lamenting Eurydice’s death and his failed attempts in finding her. One notable scene is when the Stones complain about the happy conversations between Eurydice (Kaitlin Burke) and her father (Joshua Schubart), saying, “Stones are way too busy for conversations because we are too busy being stones.” At the climax of the drama, where both Eurydice and her father dive into the underworld river to forget about the painful memories of living, the Stones also comment amusingly, “Oh, the conversations have finally stopped!”

    The talkback after the Oct. 19 matinee performance opened into Ruhl’s central theme of memory and how it affects the living. Adrienne Sowers, the Dramaturg, brought up a great point about how we can choose to remember and forget about things in our life. In the process, however, we lose part of our personality and our conscience. We see this with Eurydice when she first enters the underworld in the play. She has no sense of self and seems lost. Finally then, you have to “enter the river” and forget everything you ever felt, known, or saw before “Eurydice” in order to fully appreciate its uniqueness.

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