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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    The Black Keys

    The Black Keys are the type of band that can bring you closer to another person. This happens simply because you are both fans of the band and appreciate their talent, not to mention you actually know who they are.

    The Black Keys have released four albums since 2002 and are set to release their latest album, “Attack and Release,” on Apr. 1. In preparation for the band’s next album release I felt it was only right to pay my respects to their first and in my opinion, best album, in an attempt to spread the word on an unknown talent that deserves more attention.

    “The Big Come Up” was the Black Keys’ first album which was released in late 2002. The quality that first drew me towards the Black Keys was their unique style and creativity. The band is notorious for using “medium fidelity,” which is a technique that uses tape recorders and analog effects which makes the music sound dated and scratchy.

    This technique also brings a bit of the future to a blues type sound that would otherwise sound outdated. Both the first two tracks on the album, “Busted” and “Do the Rump,” seem to use analog effects the most but the rest of the songs on the album also manage to slip it in somewhere.

    “I’ll Be Your Man” is a raw blues filled love song with a catchy beat that is guaranteed to get stuck on repeat inside your head. The heavy beat of Auerbach on guitar will send you into a frenzy that will have you on the edge of your seat jamming along.

    The band also manages to bring the legendary Beatles back to life on track nine by covering the song, “She Said, She Said.” Wu-Tang Clan drummer Patrick Carney mixes hip-hop with blues and rock creating an innovative sound that truly honors the Beatles. Don’t forget to tune in to the tape recorder sounds nestled in the background of the song. It almost makes you think that your record is playing backwards.

    Although it may not be one of my top played, the most intriguing song on the “The Big Come Up” is “240 Years Before Your Time.” The track starts off with a tape-recorded voice speaking over raw guitar riffs and slow steady drum beat. At first it is somewhat reminiscent of the “Sunscreen” song, but then the music stops abruptly. Since it is the last track on the album, it is only natural to assume the CD has come to an end. But, this break in the music, which last just over 20 minutes, is only an interlude into the second part of the song that will blow your mind if you can hold out.

    Now when you hear the words black keys, I hope that your first instinct is no longer to think of those little keys on a piano. Hopefully, you will be reminded of the band, and you will spread the word about their music to friends and family.

    Be sure to keep an eye out for “Attack and Release” in April and to check out their first album “The Big Come Up” for a brief history on the new age of blues.

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