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The Statesman

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The Statesman

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    Reel Deal: Fracture

    ‘Fracture’ takes after ‘Law and Order: Criminal Intent.’ It is a very popular show, so I’ll assume you understand the reference and the plot formula. Like the show, the film is not a murder mystery because the audience witnesses the murder. And yes, he confesses to the crime. The case seems like another win for young A.D.A. Willy Beachum but as the investigation and trial progress, it becomes evident that Ted Crawford’s plan involved more than just killing his wife.

    Ted Crawford’s wife was much younger than him and found enjoyment being with another man who was practically a stranger to her – due to mutual secrets and agreed upon rules. Ted is not the kind to be disrespected without punishing those who caused him humiliation.

    However, there was one glitch in his plan. Willy Beachum was an arrogant winner that was forced to balance his job as a civil servant while on his way up to a corporate office and salary. Though this case could have jeopardized the latter if he lost, it would validate his greatness if he won. If he could convict Ted, he could convict anyone. All he needed was to find the gun.

    ‘ There are only two main female characters in the film – Ted’s cheating and almost dead wife, Jennifer Crawford, played by Embeth Davidtz, and Willy’s new boss / girlfriend, Nikki Gardner, played by Rosamund Pike, who was a ‘Bond-Girl’ in 2002. These women were to be nothing more than the male viewers’ eye candy. Whatever professional life Nikki had was not shown except for dressing like a female attorney. Feminist theorists would have a field day with this film.

    Casting Anthony Hopkins as a clever and careful murderer was bordering on typecasting but he doesn’t seem to mind. He has been in the business a very long time and has played enough other characters. A lawyer is new for Ryan Gosling though he too had played a clever and careful murderer. These men had great chemistry. Their differences in age and attitude were well matched and contrasted.

    It is interesting that even though the story was set and filmed in Los Angeles, Hollywood culture was not involved. The murderer, his wife, her lover, and the A.D.A. were regular people. It was as if the film business did not exist there, as if it were more like Miami than L.A. As a result, the city is not home to only celebrities and they are not the only victims of crimes in this location. Normal people live and die near Sunset Blvd., too.

    Though some of the details of the characters are different, both men (and supporting characters) are the latest of long-performed conventions. Though some of the details in the case are different, it’s solution is the latest of long-utilized conventions. There is no innovation. For two hours you are watching a genuinely good movie that could have gone straight to television and or DVD. And due to today’s market, ‘Fracture’ will be on shelves soon.

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