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The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

The Student News Site of Stony Brook University

The Statesman

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    Double O’s of Astonishment for 007

    Terrific stunts, exotic cars, futuristic gadgets, and beautiful women are the perfect recipe for a Bond flick. This weekend’s selection for review was the new James Bond film, 007: Casino Royale, featuring Daniel Craig, Hollywood’s latest Bond.

    Living up to the much-anticipated role of the new James Bond, Daniel Craig performed spectacularly in Ian Fleming’s revamped plot line. Directed by Martin Campbell, the plot line was refreshingly smooth, and the characters each owned a portion of the screen.

    Camera angles and witty dialogue provided for a fast-paced, deliciously action-filled Bond film. Following the given recipe for success, pairing it with an undeniably handsome actor and throwing in a few twists and some torture, Campbell ruled the box office with his action hit.

    The movie was initially launched as a ‘prequel’ to the line of Bond adventures, providing us with details of James Bond’s ’00’ or ‘double 0’ status. The opening sequence features an ethereal chase on foot, climbing to great heights, literally. Both the villain and Bond can be seen scaling buildings, and gymnastically mastering the scaffolds of a nearby construction site in Uganda. Following this, we see how Bond gets his ‘teacher’s pet’ status with the mysterious ‘M’ by his brilliant display of intelligence and wit.

    Following Bond to the Bahamas, we meet his first femme fatale, Solange, whose fatale factor ends in a fatal accident. At the same time, Bond pursues her husband, Dimitrios, an affiliate of Le Chiffre, the banker to the world’s terrorist organizations. His pursuit brings him to the location of a high stakes Poker game in Montenegro, at Le Casino Royale. Accompanied by the intelligent and beautiful, Vesper Lynd, Bond enters into a Poker game with the intention to beat Le Chiffre’s mathematical genius.

    Sitting through the gripping game of Poker, we discover the origins of Bond’s famous drink, as well as his suave as he undergoes his own cardiac arrest. Undeniably, Daniel Craig is one of those actors who will be talked about fondly long after his debut as Bond, possibly being featured in more upcoming Bond films.

    As for the other characters, ample credit must be given to the French actress, Eva Green, who is undoubtedly talented as Vesper Lynd. Even beyond her looks, her character brings deep conviction and a layer to the story. Judi Dench, with her cunning stiff lip, is unmistakable in her stunning portrayal of M. Even Jeffrey Wright, as Felix Leiter, and Isaach de Bankol’eacute; as Steven Obanno. Of course, none of them are show stealers. That is where Craig’s acting pinnacle comes in.

    As always, there is no simple resolution to this film, after all, when is there ever an easy answer to James Bond? The audience is left gripping their seat much after the credits begin to roll; rethinking and replaying the quick sequences of dramatic action and intelligence. There were some gaps in the film, and some space-time dilemma, however it is safe to say this an extraordinary flick which deserves an instant replay, and quite possibly a spot on the DVD shelf at home.

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