Firefighters respond to brush fire behind Tabler Quad

Firefighters work to extinguish a small brush fire behind Tabler Quad. (JESUS PICHARDO / THE STATESMAN)

Firefighters work to extinguish a small brush fire behind Tabler Quad. (JESUS PICHARDO / THE STATESMAN)

Due to wind direction and speed, a small brush fire ignited in a patch of bamboo on private property behind Tabler Quad and spread onto Stony Brook University property around 11:30 a.m. today, according to Assistant Chief of Police Lawrence Zacarese.

Stony Brook University Police, Fire Marshals and Stony Brook Fire Department responded to the call with four police cruisers, three fire marshal vehicles and two fire engines.

According to Zacarese, the fire was contained to a 20 by 30 foot area and firefighters were able to quickly get it under control. There was no property damage or injuries.

 

Small fire breaks out on campus bus

Emergency response vehicles closed down a portion of Circle Road as fluid and residue from an engine fire aboard a campus bus Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013 was cleaned up. (Mike Pedersen / The Statesman)

Emergency response vehicles closed down a portion of Circle Road as fluid and residue from an engine fire aboard a campus bus Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013 was cleaned up. (Mike Pedersen / The Statesman)

An engine compartment fire broke out on a campus bus at approximately 9:30 a.m. this morning near the Roth/Tabler bus stop on the Outer Loop route, according to Assistant Chief of Police Lawrence Zacarese.

All 11 students and the bus driver were safely evacuated and fire marshals were able to put out the fire with a small fire extinguisher. There was no fire department response.

“The bus driver came around the circle and was able to determine there was a funny odor on the bus,” Zacarese said. “He pulled over and the fire marshals were here almost immediately.”

The portion of Circle Road in front of the bus stop was temporarily closed while engine fluids and residue from the fire were cleaned up.

SBU police officer strikes pedestrian with patrol car

A Stony Brook Police Department cruiser is removed from a ditch near the Tabler Residence Quad after an officer struck a female student on the sidewalk. (ANUSHA MOOKERJEE / THE STATESMAN)

A Stony Brook Police Department cruiser is removed from a ditch near the Tabler Residence Quad after an officer struck a female student on the sidewalk. (ANUSHA MOOKERJEE / THE STATESMAN)

A University Police car struck Stony Brook student Brianna Bifone on the sidewalk near the Tabler West Bus Stop on Circle Road at 10:12 p.m. on Thursday while responding to an emergency call, according to multiple sources close to the situation.

The car continued into an embankment, pinning Bifone beneath the rear of the vehicle.

“According to eyewitness reports, the responding vehicle was traveling with its emergency lights activated when it struck a sidewalk which caused it to veer onto the opposite walkway, subsequently striking the student pedestrian,” Chief of Police Robert Lenahan said in a statement.

Daniel Wolbrom, chief of Stony Brook Volunteer Ambulance Corps (SBVAC), said Bifone’s legs were pinned beneath the car for about 30 minutes before she was extricated and moved to an ambulance.

Both Bifone and the police officer were taken to Stony Brook University Hospital for evaluation.

Bifone is reported to be in fair condition, while the police officer, who sustained minor injuries, was treated and released from the hospital, Lenahan said.

The identity of the police officer has yet to be released.

The police officer was responding to a call regarding a “large group” at the Student Union when he struck the student, Assistant Chief of Police Lawrence Zacarese said.

The accident is currently under investigation, but Zacarese said there was no reason to believe the police officer was under the influence at the time of the incident.

The police officer radioed for assistance and emergency vehicles from University Police, Stony Brook Fire Department, Setauket Fire Department, SBVAC and Suffolk County Police Department arrived on the scene.

Check back for updates to the story.

Unsafe Speeds and Broken Road Rules Plague Campus

 

By Marc Newman

Walking around Stony Brook University might seem more like stroll through the autobahn than a walk through a friendly neighborhood campus. Cars roll through stop signs, move at double the speed limits, and whip around turns while failing to yield the right of way.

‘Just the other day I saw a car right in front of Roosevelt Quad go right through a stop sign going at least thirty miles per hour, while I was making a turn,’ junior Rares Saftoiu said. ‘He could have caused a huge accident, like many of the drivers on campus that just pretend stop signs don’t apply to them on campus.’

Saftoiu is not alone in his concerns. Doug Little, Deputy Chief of Police and Chief of Community Relations and Patrol is asking that drivers apply their smarts not only in the classroom on campus, but also on the roads.

People here think ‘speed, speed, speed; and it’s causing a lot of accidents,’ said Little. Nineteen motor-vehicle accidents have been reported since January alone. While Little concedes that weather has been a factor through this, nothing can help explain the nearly 50% increase in moving violation tickets issued from 2001 to 2002 other than poor driving.

‘Some people talk on their cell phones and drive in the left lane eating popcorn like they were in their own living rooms,’ Little said.

He noted that using handheld phones is illegal, and that a fresh New York State law prohibited drivers from even moving when a pedestrian on a curb approaches a cross-walk.

‘Yield at crosswalks and take our 15 or 30 mile per hour road signs seriously,’ said Little. He noted that many of the tickets issued on campus had drivers moving at fifty to sixty miles per hour,speeds more suited for highways than for a 35,000 person campus.

Little recalled a story of one of his patrol officers who clocked a driver going 81 miles per hour on the North Loop in front of the LIRR station. Since then, the police department in conjunction with theTransportation and Parking Services on campus installed a new stop sign. A new light was also installed on the South Loop Road entrance to West Campus.

‘The new light at the [South Loop] intersection has been really helpful,’ sophomore Matthew Gershen said. ‘I don’t feel stressed out approaching that area anymore.’

There are, however, limitations to how many steps Stony Brook can take to control the driving problems on campus. Additional speed bumps often cannot be installed because of laws that prohibit them on public roadways. The main entrance is undergoing major construction since the building of the Wang Center, and most of the signs there are in limbo.

But surprisingly, Little said that most of the problems on campus occur where there are plenty of signs put up. Well-demarcated crosswalks at Tabler and Roosevelt have been the sites of the most accidents in past years. It is left to the driver to yield to pedestrians and follow the rules of the road.

‘No one cares about pedestrians,’ senior Pratichi Kothari said. ‘I’ve been in the middle of a crosswalk and had someone step on the gas and pass within a foot of my body.’

Additionally, Little asks that everyone on campus make sure his or her car is inspected and registered on time. ‘A lot of students with their parents’ cars leave the car on campus for long periods of time, and don’t remember to keep-up their vehicle,’ Ralph Stears, Jr., Head of the Police Department Record Office said. The police department distributes tickets for expired registration and inspection.

Little asks that anyone who notices particular driving problem areas on campus to make that information available to UniversityPolice.

Motor VehicleStatistics for SUNY Stony Brook

‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 2001′ ‘ ‘ 2002

Hit and Runs’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 100′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 96

Accidents’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 305′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 296

Tickets’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘

Moving Violations’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 1596′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 2087′

Warnings’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 677′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 1087

Parking Violations (Inspections/Registrations)’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 540′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 382

Campus Parking ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 10,553′ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ 10,287

 

Tabler Quad Takes the Bleeding Cup

The Second Annual Residential Blood Drive Award Ceremony was held Thursday, March 14, to honor the participants in this years blood drive at Stony Brook University. The event was held in the atrium of Benedict College.

The program recognized the residence hall directors and residence assistants who coordinated the blood drive in each quad. Chris Neumann, RHD of Gershwin College, and Erica Cordazzo, Residence Hall Director (RHD) of Dreiser College organized the ceremony. Among the speakers were Carl Hanes, Deputy to the President and blood drive chairman, and President Shirley Strum Kenny.

This years blood drive set a new record for the university, with 395 pints of blood collected, Hanes said. The blood drive was also able to gather 204 new bone marrow donors, which Hanes said was impressive. This was also the first time the university’s three apartment complexes participated in the blood drive.

“Any successful program like this doesn’t just happen,” Hanes said. “It takes a lot of special people.”

The people who helped run this years successful program were awarded with plaques. Plaques were also given to the building in each quad that donated the most blood.

Gershwin College in Roth quad had 15 percent participation, while Roosevelt quads Wagner College had 16 percent. Hamilton College in Kelly quad had a 17 percent turnout, and Mendelson’s Irving College had 23 percent. James College in H quad came in second with 28 percent, and Tabler’s Dreiser College had the greatest participation total with 34 percent.

A trophy cup was also awarded to the quad that had the highest overall turnout. Kelly quad had an 8 percent total, just behind Roth quad with 9 percent. Mendelson quad had 11 percent, following Roosevelt quads 12 percent. H quad again came in second with 15 percent, and Tabler quad won the cup with 27 percent of total residents participating. Quad Director Qin Wang was on hand to accept the cup.

“I’m very proud of my staff,” Wang said. “Not only the RHDs, but the RAs, the student leaders and the residents too.”

Likewise, President Kenny was very proud when she addressed the crowd, which numbered about 30. “This is very overwhelming,” Kenny said. “Several times this year there was a blood shortage, but there has been an outpouring of blood donations.”The university is already looking forward to next years blood drive, and the opportunity to help again, said Hanes. “I’m counting on you,” he said. “I’m sure you can do it.”

President Kenny added that Stony Brook University has done much to help its community. “You have really done a splendid job,” Kenny said. “You’re lifesavers.”